Events

City Talks - Urban Landscape Seminar Series

Summary

Urban Design and the Cycling Renaissance

Start Date

7th May 2014 11:00am

End Date

7th May 2014 1:00pm

Venue

Aurora Lecture Theatre, IMAS Building, Castray Esplanade, Hobart

RSVP / Contact Information

tasmania@aila.org.au

The single purpose asphalt street is dead and the mid-century visions that spawned it are dying. People are awakening to a rebirth of the multi-purpose street for people, cyclists and motor vehicles.

This seminar examines how cyclists, amongst others, will use the street, what it will look like and how we can get consensus to take the steps necessary to make a difference. 

Introduction by Bruce Echberg Landscape Architect, Architect and cycling enthusiast, from Urban Initiatives.

Speakers:

Steven Fleming
A writer, academic at the University of Tasmania, speaker and consultant, Steven works at the theoretical limits of the cycling renaissance. He combines passions for writing, cycling and teaching with a PhD in philosophy and career as architect and urban designer of new towns to explore concepts of aesthetics and spatial planning around the design of streets. He is author of Cycle Space and leads the Cycle-Space Studio, the latter conceiving creative architectural responses to cycling.

Harry Barber
Harry was at the helm of Bicycle Network (formerly Bicycle Victoria) for 20+ years before stepping down as CEO in 2013. In his time, the Bicycle Network grew to be the largest bicycle organisation in Australia and one of the largest in the world as measured by membership, staff and income. The reach of Bicycle Network is vast, its annual events multi-million dollar businesses in their own right. Harry describes himself today as a change maker and choice architect. He has a wealth of knowledge around strategic planning and urban design and will speak about how we need to get our streets to do a lot more than carry traffic.

Includes light lunch. 

 Logo of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects

Click here to download flyer (PDF 342KB)