Events

Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World

Summary

Human beings have changed the world and the most sensible way to deal with that is to manage it for the greatest good.

Start Date

3rd Nov 2015 6:00pm

End Date

3rd Nov 2015 7:30pm

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre, University Centre, Sandy Bay campus

RSVP / Contact Information

Enquiries: Ted Lefroy, (03) 6226 2626

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presented by

Emma Marris

Author of Rambunctious Garden: saving nature in a post-wild world

 

Emma Marris, a professional science writer, has produced an eminently reasonable, well-researched, and engagingly written defence of the notion that human beings have changed the world and the most sensible way to deal with that is to manage it for the greatest good. She demonstrates very convincingly that communities and ecosystems have always been in flux as the physical world changes around them. The idea of freezing them at some arbitrary moment in time is as wrongheaded as it is impractical. Shortly after Marris's book appeared there was a flurry of articles in the professional literature advancing precisely the same ideas. Among the best are Carroll (2011. Evolutionary Applications 4:184–199) and Thomas (2011. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 26:216 –221). But Marris got there first, and with luck her wise words will be read and acted upon far and wide.

Prof. Arthur Shapiro, Center for Population Biology, University of California, Davis, California

Hosted by the Centre for Environment.

 


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