Events

Dementia Can Be Prevented: Fact or Fiction?

Summary

Hear from Professor Karen Ritchie, who will present the latest scientific evidence. At the conclusion of the talk you will be able to ask questions of our expert panel as they lead discussions on dementia.

Start Date

2nd Nov 2017 6:00pm

End Date

2nd Nov 2017 7:30pm

Venue

Medical science Precinct, lecture theatre 2

RSVP / Contact Information

Email wicking.enquiries@utas.edu.au or phone 6226 4239

presented by

Professor Karen Ritchie

Director of the French National Institute of Medical Research (INSERM)

Dementia is currently the second leading cause of death of Australians. By 2050 over 1 million people are predicted to be living with dementia nationally and over 131 million worldwide. We are constantly bombarded with new ways to keep our brains healthy - but can dementia actually be prevented?

Join us in a discussion on dementia prevention. Hear from Professor Karen Ritchie international expert in the field, who will tell us about the latest scientific evidence. Ask questions of our expert panel as they lead a discussion on dementia and what it means for our communities.

Professor Karen Ritchie

Professor Karen Ritchie is a neuropsychologist and epidemiologist, who began her career with the Health Services Evaluation Unit, University of Oxford (Sir Richard Doll) and the Social Psychiatry Research Unit, MRC Australia (Professor Scott Henderson).

She is currently Director of the French National Institute of Medical Research (INSERM), Research Unit 1061 (Neuropsychiatry) in Montpellier. The research work currently being undertaken by this group includes population, clinical and molecular studies of neurological and psychiatric disorders notably dementia, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, suicide, sleep pathologies, and care evaluation. The group also collaborates with the European Government and WHO in the development of population indicators for mental health surveillance.

She is a former member of the Board of Directors of the International Psychogeriatric Association, and worked as an editorial board member of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dementia, International Psychogeriatrics, Neuronale. She has also acted as consultant to the Mental Health Division of the World Health Organisation and is a member of the Board of the European Institute for Women's Health. Formerly also Honorary Professor at Imperial College London, she is currently Visiting Professor, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh.