Events

Giant Icebergs and the Future of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

Summary

Australian Institute of Physics Public Lecture

Start Date

20th Sep 2017 8:00pm

End Date

20th Sep 2017 9:00pm

Venue

Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay campus

RSVP / Contact Information

E: Stanislav.Shabala@utas.edu.au; or T: 03 62268502

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Presented by

Dr​ ​Sue​ ​Cook

Ice​ ​Shelf​ ​Glaciologist,
Antarctic​ ​Climate​ ​&​ ​Ecosystems​ ​Cooperative​ ​Research​ ​Centre

ABSTRACT:
Events​ ​such​ ​as​ ​the​ ​1​ ​trillion-tonne​ ​iceberg​ ​which​ ​recently​ ​broke​ ​away​ ​from​ ​the​ ​Larsen​ ​C​ ​Ice Shelf​ ​capture​ ​headlines​ ​around​ ​the​ ​world.​ ​But​ ​what​ ​can​ ​these​ ​icebergs​ ​really​ ​tell​ ​us​ ​about the​ ​future​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Antarctic​ ​Ice​ ​Sheet?​ ​This​ ​lecture​ ​examines​ ​what​ ​we​ ​know​ ​about​ ​how icebergs​ ​form,​ ​how​ ​they​ ​are​ ​affected​ ​by​ ​climate​ ​change,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​implications​ ​for​ ​Antarctica’s future​ ​contributions​ ​to​ ​sea​ ​level​ ​rise. 

SPEAKER​ ​PROFILE:
Dr​ ​Sue​ ​Cook​ ​is​ ​a​ ​glaciologist​ ​studying​ ​the​ ​Antarctic​ ​Ice​ ​Sheet.​ ​Her​ ​work​ ​focuses​ ​on​ ​the floating​ ​ice​ ​shelves​ ​which​ ​occur​ ​where​ ​the​ ​ice​ ​sheet​ ​meets​ ​the​ ​ocean.​ ​This​ ​is​ ​where​ ​the​ ​ice sheet​ ​loses​ ​most​ ​of​ ​its​ ​mass.​ ​Her​ ​work​ ​ranges​ ​from​ ​fieldwork​ ​using​ ​geophysical​ ​equipment​ ​to directly​ ​measure​ ​melt​ ​rates​ ​underneath​ ​ice​ ​shelves,​ ​to​ ​computer​ ​models​ ​predicting​ ​the​ ​rate of​ ​iceberg​ ​formation.​ ​The​ ​aim​ ​of​ ​this​ ​research​ ​is​ ​ultimately​ ​to​ ​improve​ ​our​ ​predictions​ ​of how​ ​fast​ ​Antarctic​ ​will​ ​contribute​ ​to​ ​future​ ​sea​ ​level​ ​rise.​ ​Sue​ ​obtained​ ​her​ ​PhD​ ​from​ ​the Swansea​ ​University​ ​(UK)​ ​in​ ​2012​ ​and​ ​afterwards​ ​worked​ ​as​ ​a​ ​postdoctoral​ ​researcher​ ​at​ ​the University​ ​Centre​ ​in​ ​Svalbard.​ ​She​ ​joined​ ​the​ ​University​ ​of​ ​Tasmania​ ​in​ ​2015,​ ​where​ ​she​ ​is currently​ ​working​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Antarctic​ ​Climate​ ​&​ ​Ecosystems​ ​Cooperative​ ​Research​ ​Centre.

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