Events

Civil society versus Big Food? The role of social movements in achieving a sustainable food future

Summary

A seminar by visiting scholar Dr Colin Sage on the role of social movements in achieving a sustainable food

Start Date

20th Apr 2018 3:00pm

End Date

20th Apr 2018 4:00pm

Venue

Social Sciences Room 322, Sandy Bay

RSVP / Contact Information

No RSVP required. Enquiries to ISC.Admin@utas.edu.au

Colin Sage

Presented by

Dr Colin Sage

University College Cork, Republic of Ireland

Visiting scholar Dr Colin Sage will discuss the gradual emergence of food social movements amid a global trend toward ultra-processed, livestock-derived products and the challenge of finding a politics of action for structural change in the food system.

The food system is always in transition, but recent decades have witnessed a process of corporate consolidation and worldwide transformation of dietary practices featuring a greater composition of ultra-processed and livestock-derived products. The gradual emergence of food social movements, though highly heterogeneous, represents something of an ‘alternative’ vision for food and has, at the very least, secured a place for key terms such as ‘local’, ‘sustainable’ and ‘healthy’. The challenge, however, is to find a politics of action that can lead to structural change in the food system, a task not made easier by ‘green tech’ entrepreneurs eager to hijack and subvert sustainability in pursuit of a corporate agenda. The seminar will explore some of these issues as we imagine alternative transition trajectories.

Colin Sage is Senior Lecturer in Geography at Ireland’s University College Cork and currently a visiting scholar in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Tasmania. His research centres on food systems and their interconnections with environment and human health. He is chair of the Cork Food Policy Council, which he helped create in 2013.

This seminar is presented by the School of Social Sciences and Institute for the Study of Social Change at the University of Tasmania. All welcome.