Events

Climate Ethics Amidst Climate Injustice

Summary

In this talk, US-based political scientist Associate Professor Steve Vanderheiden will consider the urgency of viewing climate justice as entailing responsibilities beyond the nation state, asking: What ethical responsibilities do citizens have now to promote climate justice, in light of what their national governments are and are not doing?

Start Date

8th Feb 2018 7:30pm

End Date

8th Feb 2018 8:30pm

Venue

Hobart Town Hall

RSVP / Contact Information

E: jan.linehan@utas.edu.au or T: 0474 214 080


presented by

Associate Professor Steve Vanderheiden

University of Colorado at Boulder

With the Paris Agreement in force without the United States - and with the Trump administration's hostility toward climate science and embrace of fossil fuels - the prospects for equitable international cooperation on climate change in the near future look grim. In this talk, US-based political scientist Associate Professor Steve Vanderheiden will consider the urgency of viewing climate justice as entailing responsibilities beyond the nation state, asking: What ethical responsibilities do citizens have now to promote climate justice, in light of what their national governments are and are not doing?

Steve Vanderheiden is Associate Professor of political science and environmental studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder in the USA. His research focuses on issues of justice and democracy in climate change politics and policy, including efforts to mitigate its causes as well as adapt to its effects. His book Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change (Oxford, 2008) won the Harold and Margaret Sprout award from the International Studies Association for best book in international environmental politics in 2009.

This public talk is being held as part of a multidisciplinary conference examining the barriers to responding to climate change, implementing climate justice, and proposing ways forward. Hosted by the University of Tasmania, with support of its Faculty of Law, the University of Utrecht Ethics Institute; the University of Tasmania's Institute for the Study of Social Change; the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC); and the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Science (IMAS).

This event is sponsored by the University of Tasmania Institute for the Study of Social Change, Sustainable Living Tasmania and the Hobart City Council.