Events

Sami Health Research and the SamBa Study: A quantitative analysis of Sami child development & health in the Arctic

Summary

Public lecture exploring Sami Health and Child Development

Start Date

8th Oct 2018 5:30pm

End Date

8th Oct 2018 7:00pm

Venue

Centenary Lecture Theatre, Sandy Bay campus

RSVP / Contact Information

E. jacob.prehn@utas.edu.au; T. 0497 076 567

The SamBa (Samiske Barn) study is a longitudinal study of ethnically diverse children in the Arctic part of Norway. The study aims to fill the gap of knowledge on early child development and health in Arctic children by combining data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and a supplementary data collection based on a participatory research design. By collaborating with the Longitudinal study on Indigenous Children in Australia this is the first project to study social and cultural determinants of Indigenous child development and health across Indigenous peoples.

Professor Siv Kvernmo will give an overview about the indigenous Sami people and the development of Sami health research in Norway with Dr Siv Eirin Nilsen, presenting the SamBa study.

About the presenters

Professor Siv Eirin Nilsen is Sami and since 2001 has worked as a Clinical Psychiatrist in Finnmark, the northernmost county in Norway. Currently a PhD student at the University of Tromsø The Arctic University of Norway working with a study on child development and health in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children.  

First Professor Siv Kvernmo will give an overview about the Indigenous Sami People and the development of Sami health research in Norway. Then Siv Eirin Nilsen, MD, will present the SamBa study. The SamBa (Samiske Barn) study is a longitudinal study of ethnically diverse children in the Arctic part of Norway. The study aims to fill the gap of knowledge on early child development and health in Arctic children.

Dr Siv Kvernmo is Sami and a Professor in Child and Adolescent Mental Health at University of Tromsø The Arctic University of Norway. Until late 2011 she was heading the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University hospital of North Norway, and has for thirty years been doing extensive clinical work with children and families.

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