Events

Sustainability in the Pub: Life Below Water

Summary

Conversations distilling future wicked problems on our island one Sustainable Development Goal at a time.

Start Date

17th Sep 2019 5:30pm

End Date

17th Sep 2019 7:00pm

Venue

Saint John Craft Beer Bar, 133 St John Street, Launceston

RSVP / Contact Information

Enquiries: E. Sustainability.in.the.Pub@utas.edu.au; T. 03 6226 7226

Register Now

Turning the tide on estuary health: Stewardship of kanamaluka/Tamar Estuary in a warming world

The United Nations set 17 “Sustainable Development Goals” as a blueprint to achieve a better, more sustainable future for all. Come along to Sustainability in the Pub to be led by some of Tasmania’s local thinkers in deliberating over what needs to happen today to achieve these goals by 2030.

September’s event explores the stewardship of kanamaluka/Tamar Estuary in a rapidly warming world. With pressures from agriculture, mining and urban/industrial development over the past two hundred years adversely affecting kanamaluka, the health and resilience of our waterway has become everyone’s business.

Goal 14 of the UN's 2030 agenda, Life Below Water, is a call to action to conserve and responsibly manage our vulnerable marine resources in order to achieve healthy and sustainable oceans.

Led in conversation by City of Launceston’s Cr Tim Walker, we bring together speakers offering their own personal and professional perspectives on what kanamaluka's future should look like.

On the panel:

  • Dr Andy Fischer, IMAS, University of Tasmania
  • Dr Wendy Aitken, School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania
  • Neil Grose, Launceston Chamber of Commerce

Tamar Estuary & Esk Rivers (TEER) Program Manager, Dr Jo Fearman from NRM North, will respond to the panel, share how a collaborative TEER partnership is making positive impacts, and take part in an audience Q&A on this compelling issue in our community.

Come to Sustainability in the Pub to discuss, deliberate, drink and decide how to make sure our future is a glass half full not half empty.

(Photo credit: Amanda Locatelli)